2017-Apr-22, Saturday

mindstalk: (Default)
One possible categorization of train stations:

* You emerge, and are immediately in a business district or otherwise interesting area. Examples: Central, Harvard, Porter, and Davis Squares on the Boston Red Line, along with Charles/MGH and Quincy Center; Kimball on the Chicago Brown Line; almost any downtown station, at least in a healthy downtown during the workday; Maverick, Orient Heights, and Beachmont on the Boston Blue Line.

* You emerge, in a parking lot or bus station or other thing that involves a fair bit more walking, but at least can see where to go toward something interesting. Examples: Fields Corner on the Boston Red Line, where you're at a long bus stop but can spy businesses; Assembly on the Boston Orange Line, where I think you'll have to walk a block but you can see the TOD from the station; maybe Wellington, where IIRC you have to walk through a big parking garage to the TOD, but there might be signs telling you to go.

* You emerge, and see no reason not to turn around and catch another train somewhere else. Examples: some Jamaica Plain Boston Orange Line stops, where you come out to a bridge surrounded by traffic; some stops on the south branch of Chicago's Blue Line, where the train runs in a freeway median, and you come out onto an overpass, and there's nothing around; Braintree on Boston's Red Line, where after two minutes on a ramp I still hadn't even left the station yet, and couldn't see anything but giant boxy buildings; I suspect Malden Center on Boston Orange, where you're not far from Malden's center but I'm not sure you'd see it; likewise Sullivan Square on Boston Orange, where the most interesting part I know of is hidden over a rise.

Note that can include "there is stuff but you don't see it" and "there's pretty much nothing around, for real."

US air marshalls

2017-Apr-22, Saturday 14:37
mindstalk: (Default)
"Someone forgets their gun" isn't that newsworthy; people make mistakes. This article is more interesting for the other terrifying information it includes:
"newly hired air marshals do not currently receive on-the-job training"
"Although it has an $835 million budget, agents cover less than 1% of US domestic and international flights"
"A CNN report in 2015 exposed the long hours, chaotic schedules and use of drugs and alcohol among federal air marshals"
"obtained a now-classified study commissioned by the TSA that revealed 75% of air marshals flying domestic missions were sleep-deficient"

I like that 'now-classified' bit. "Oh god, they found problems. Let's classify it so people can't see!" This is also part of why it's hard to take "leaked classified information" as an inherent civic sin.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/21/politics/air-marshal-gun-airplane-bathroom/index.html

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