2018-Dec-10, Monday

mindstalk: (Default)
Based on my limited experience in Modern Art museums and galleries, you would think no one was doing traditional oil paintings any more.

https://www.guildofbostonartists.org/artists/
mindstalk: (Default)
Belatedly, as I left three weeks ago.

* Many of the subway trains are this strange magical thing where the cars are hooked up like an articulated bus, and you can easily walk from one and of the whole train to the other without opening any doors. I am told this is standard for modern trains. Boston and NYC are not "modern".

* No ads on those new trains, or even space for them, except for a little electronic display next to the map.

* The greenhouses in the Botanical Garden are pretty neat, and membership is cheap -- CAN$20.50 one visit, and CAN$45 for a year's membership, I would totally get one if I lived there.

* It's not just the milk; all the grocery store cheese is labeled with the percentage of milkfat. Given the French roots, I don't know of this is more so you can avoid it or so you can seek it out.

* There were at least two bakeries, with fresh croissants, within 5-7 minute walk of where I was staying. OTOH at least one of the Large Supermarkets had rather meh bread selection.

* There was a macaronic and cheese restaurant, 'Macbar'. I had unkind thoughts about Quebec crossing French language and English cooking. This is the province whose special dish is fries with gravy and cheese curds.

* The steaks I bought from the markets came out pretty awesome.

* Canadian customs was a lot faster and more efficient than US. And somewhat friendlier. At least the Canadians didn't tell us they would confiscate a cell phone on sight. Entering the US we stood in line for over 10 minutes while "Agriculture" combed our bus thoroughly.
mindstalk: (lizqueen)
I mentioned the Guild of Boston Artists. I found it Saturday by walking around Back Bay and going inside. One featured artist was there, and while I did ask a question about her art (it had a light quality reminiscent of pastels), I also asked the mundane question of how long it took to do a painting. Variable, but she went with an average of 25 hours, for the modest sizes displayed. That's for physical execution, like to copy an existing painting; design is a lot more.

Prices were also variable but I'll guess an average of $2500. So $100/hour, or $50/hour assuming double time for design (which would mean coming up with an artwork in under a week). Given the vagaries of freelance life, hardly unreasonable compensation on her end. I am unlikely to ever spend that much on a single work, though, and give thanks for prints.

Some other paintings in the galley were more; I think one was a bit short of $100,000. I forget if it was particularly large or detailed.

The website of another artist says she does oil portraits starting from $8,000, taking 5-8 sittings of 3 hours. At 24 hours, that's $333/hour. My first thoughts were unkind about her. My second thoughts were that if someone is willing and able to pay $8,000 on what amounts to a glorified photograph, it is practically her social or class duty to relieve them of their money.

As a side note, another gallery was right next door, just one artist working in acrylics and providing prints and printed clothing(!), but apparently "print to canvas" is also a thing, IIRC replicating the physical texture of the paint. Though maybe the texture comes from hand work.

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