mindstalk: (thoughtful)
So there are various ways government policy could try to make housing cheaper, but one that I see a lot of people pushing now is a form of inclusionary zoning. Specifically, especially from what I've been told by Cambridge/Somerville politicos, requiring that a percentage (10-30%) of new units (of large developments) be rentable at low price. Not because they're smaller or more cheaply built, but just at a lower price. As Wikipedia says, "Many jurisdictions require that inclusionary housing units be indistinguishable from market-rate units"

(I don't know how that applies to a building that was planned to have diverse housing anyway. I suppose a percentage of each housing class?)

Developers[1] push back on this, and I've seen it described as a tax on them. Is that a fair description? Time for a simple thought experiment: imagine a building of 100 units, planned price of $1000/month, total revenue of $100,000/month. Then the city passes a new law during construction, requiring 30% be offered at $800. That's 30 units getting a $200 discount, $6000/month, which yes, you can think of as taxing the developer 6% and giving that back to the lucky tenants.

6%, not of profit, but of gross revenue. That's a lot! If the developer was anticipating profit of 5%, it is no longer worth building. Even if they anticipated 8%, that's now 2%; you might as well quit and invest in 30 year federal bonds. Or build hotels or condos that won't be hit by IZ, or just go build somewhere else.

And it can be worse. 30% requirement is high, but 20% subsidy might be low; 15% at $500/month would mean $7500, or a tax of 7.5%.

What's the alternative? Say the city instead decided to attach an explicit public subsidy to some of the new units. The $6000/month, $72,000/year cost would be spread among the whole population and tax base, not one developer. For a 77,000 person city like Somerville, that's under $1/person.

That's not quite fair though: that's just one development, and IZ applies to all of them, so we should look at that. Then again, there aren't many big developments in Somerville, which has "ambitious" plans to barely keep up with population growth at about 1% a year, and historically has done far less than that (3% total over some 20-30 year period I now forget, when Boston and MA did 12% and the country grew 24%). If we're adding units at 1% a year, and 30% of those are subsidized, then the subsidy of a new unit is spread over 300 existing ones. At a simplifying assumption of one person per unit, $2400/year ($200*12) is spread over 300 people, so $8/year.

(Most of what I've heard about recently is about a proposed 500 unit development in Union Square; assuming Somerville's 77,000 people live in 30,000 units, that's over 1% right there. But it'll take a few years.)

Of course, this is supposed to apply to all new housing, so after 30 years the subsidy support will have climbed to $240/year. This is pretty significant, especially compared to municipal taxes and revenue; probably talking about raising those up to 10% of existing levels. Also, affordable (or subsidized) units will be almost 10% of the housing stock.

But then someone might reasonably say "why should we dick around with only subsidizing new units? Why not just go ahead and subsidize 10% of all units, right now? The math's the same." And all the economists nod in agreement, and all the politicians blanch in terror...

Personal conclusion: yes, it is a tax on developers, and as with unfunded mandates[2] in general, it's an unfair tax, pushing a requirement onto a small subset of society, instead of funding it honestly out of general taxes and expenditure.

Of course, I feel that we shouldn't be trying to subsidize our way to cheap housing, which won't even address the real problem of more people wanting to live in cities now; we should enable building *more housing*, by removing the massive artificial restrictions on urban supply imposed by local governments. But that's another topic.

[1] 'Developer' has gotten a bad rep somehow; what if we called them builders, instead? It's not even a euphemism, more like an anti-euphemism: they are literally building new buildings and housing. Especially for the projects that get hit by IZ; you could argue that converting a house into apartments isn't real building (though it is real construction work, and more 'real' than hedge fund finance, say), but IZ applies to big projects, which are mostly new buildings.

But then it sounds worse: what kind of asshole opposes building new housing? (People who already have housing and don't want more neighbors, that's who.) Much easier to intone against "developers" and "profit" (as if homeowners don't hope to profit from growth in their home values, not to mention from their jobs.)

[2] Also see EMTALA, requiring ERs to stabilize anyone regardless of ability to pay; it's great that they do that, not so great that government didn't both reliably compensating them for it, so the costs were driven into other medical prices. Or landowners sometimes winning the anti-lottery of discovering there's an endangered species on their land and now they can't use it; protecting the environment is cool, but it would be fairer to compensate people for unexpected loss. And yes, strictly speaking minimum wage is an unfunded mandate on employers, and a price floor on labor, both nominally bad ideas, though that issue gets complicated by data and macroeconomics.
mindstalk: (science)
So we have this tragic scene, http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20170517 that looks bad for our heroes and the people of Paris. The power is out, the city is dark, and we can see the stars.

...the stars of the Southern Hemisphere:


Left to right: Alpha Centauri, Beta Centauri, and Crux aka the Southern Cross.

Some Spark knock the planet over?

(I did not spot this myself, but once clued in I found the image.)
mindstalk: (Default)
So, I play freecol. A while back, it started behaving badly -- popup windows would lose focus, and I'd have to lower and raise the window to get it back. It was an annoying ritual, but I stuck with it.

Today at work, I'd stopped working, but had some time to kill before my next event, so installed freecol on the VM. To my surprise, it behaved the way you'd expect.

Fresh install, so maybe I had broken configuration at home? Went home, nuked all the directories, tried again. Nope.

Well, the other difference is that I've been using twm at home -- it's primitive but lightweight and familiar -- but xfce on the work VM, out of necessity to get things like resizing display. So I installed xfce4 at home, and tried that... yep, freecol played nicely.

Maybe I had something wonk in my .xinitrc? Nuked it down to just running twm... nope, still bad.

So I guess something in a freecol update stopped playing well with a 1980s window manager. Oh well. Maybe I'll just switch to xfce at home (though it'll be confusing when I'm running Arch/xfce on both the VM and the host...) But I'll need to configure it, to get some key mappings, and move-to-focus.

Nope, I don't need to; they're there already. HOW? That's really spooky.

I hunt down the config -- .config/xfce4/ -- and look at the modification times. Some are tonight, but some are 1 Nov 2012. "Wait a minute."

See, sometime after putting Ubuntu on my laptop, I played around with a whole lot of graphical environments and window managers, then upgraded, and broke Ubuntu for good. But that's another story; the point is that it's suddenly plausible I installed xfce back then -- on another OS -- configured it to taste, and moved on, leaving the preferences buried in my home directory.

Well, I keep a detailed journal for a reason. I check... and yeah, while I don't mention xfce specifically, 1 Nov 2012 was a day of messing around with such things.

"Wow! So I somehow copied my home directory in toto, between laptops, picking up weird directories like .config. I'm impressed."

"...no, I'm a dumbass; it's the *same laptop*."

OTOH it *is* a whole different version of Linux. Did I install Arch on top of Ubuntu and keep my home dir, or copy out my home dir to an external hard drive, to copy back after installing Arch? I honestly don't remember, but either seems plausible, and would get the job done.

Actually there's an /old directory on the hard drive, basically an old root directory, which I think is evidence that I managed to drop Arch right onto Ubuntu after I made a copy. There's even /old/etc/os-release, saying "14.04 Trusty Tahr". (It was not trusty; it refused to boot and I switched to Arch. Though now I'm not sure how I made the copy. Maybe I did go through a hard drive?

Anyway, one way or another, five year old configuration I'd completely forgotten about stayed with me, and worked smoothly. I guess the real surprise is that xfce didn't change its configuration system in five years, not enough to break things!

Edit: on playing again, it was broken again! Waaaa. After more investigation, it seems broken with twm no matter what, even with an empty xinitrc, but with xfce, it breaks when scim is running. That's my Japanese input interface, I'm not giving that up. :(

I guess I could play in the VM. Or I could play less, that'd be good...
mindstalk: (lizsword)
Things I've been told by recent Lyft drivers:

* Uber and Lyft "take the same percentage", but Lyft charges more so they get more.

* Uber cheats on mileage, holding out until an attorney general was called in.

* If your ride estimate was e.g. $31, but actually was worth $22, Lyft charges you $22; Uber charges you $31, but pays the drive for a ride of $22, pocketing the difference.

* Uber often charges you surge price but doesn't pay out as a surge. Which, I note, rather defeats half the alleged point of surge pricing (luring more drivers onto the road.)

* Lyft surges based on demand, Uber often surges by the clock.

* Lots of drivers are switching to Lyft.

* Edit to add: Lyft is a lot easier for the drivers to contact and talk to when there's a problem, and more responsive.

Certainly I've been seeing a lot more Lyft availability in Boston than I did a few years ago.

Edit to add: comment below got me wondering about relative pay. A few sources:

http://www.ehow.com/info_8522975_much-average-cab-driver-make.html
http://oureverydaylife.com/much-average-cab-driver-make-9448.html
http://work.chron.com/much-fare-taxi-drivers-keep-22871.html

In 2012-2013, taxi drivers were reporting $12/hour on average. This Vox article https://www.vox.com/2014/12/17/7402311/lyft-driver-pay suggests Lyft in 2014 was similar, but that drivers were enthusiastic about the flexibility.

The Chron.com link suggests taxi companies take a 1/3 cut, and that the drivers may have to pay for gas and vehicle use out of what's left, too.

washcloths

2017-May-18, Thursday 13:19
mindstalk: (angry sky)
So, I'm used to three sizes of towel in a bathroom. Big body bath towel used for drying your body; much smaller rectangular hand towel that hangs somewhere to dry your hands on after washing your hands; square (6x6 inch?) washcloth for use in the shower. In a pinch, you can use a hanging body towel as the hand towel.

I don't think this is exotic, you find the set in any hotel room.

But the place in Orient Heights just gave me a hand towel at first. Which you can use to dry your body, but, uh. They coughed up the other two when I asked.

Place in JP gave me a body towel and a hand towel, which I used as a washcloth. My host said that was unusual, she thought people just used their hands these days, or poufs, which are a strange and alien thing to me. (Orient Heights did have two of them.)

Incidentally, I saw poufs for sale in CVS, with a sign urging you to replace them every month. So, less convenient IMO *and* cost more money.

Finally, the current place left me a bath towel and a hand towel; I gave in and bought a couple (came as a pair) of washcloths.

Modern world, end of times, youth these days, etc.
mindstalk: (Witch)
I got off at Haymarket, to check out the North End branch of the BPL. Headed the wrong way by accident, turned back, had some older Asian lady thrusting something at me. Plastic badge of well wishes or something. I tried to give it back, she refused, then asked for a donation... yeah, right.

Made it to the library, through cozy North End streets (why can't we build more like that? Stupid car culture). The library is small but architecturally neat, with a big skylight over a stone plaza, and a couple big plants. Probably a neat place to hang out in the winter.

But I have quirky beliefs, like the book shelves should be labeled by subject, and there should be a poster showing patrons what the call numbers mean. There were some subject signs but desultory and incomplete; I had to ask where the (tiny) science section was, then still hunt to find it. No label present once I did.

BPL uses Library of Congress, BTW, vs. the Dewey of the Minuteman libraries.

aliasing fi

2017-May-13, Saturday 07:12
mindstalk: (Default)
I think I mentioned not long ago that I found I'd been aliasing fi=finger which breaks if loops in my shell, and marveled that it took so long to find that. It makes more sense to me now.

1) Yeah, I didn't script much.
2) When I did do an ad hoc script at the prompt, it was a for loop.
3) Scripts you get are mostly bash scripts.
4) Even an explicitly written zsh script wouldn't have a problem: my aliases are loaded by .zshrc, which is loaded by interactive shells, i.e. not script shells[1].
5) Only when I tried pasting an if loop into a *function*, also loaded by .zshrc after my aliases, did a problem occur. Possibly it had occurred before and I simply gave up on some unnecessary function that mysteriously didn't work.

[1] This also sheds light on past failures to ssh in somewhere and invoke a function directly: not an interactive shell, so no functions loaded. When I try 'ssh ... "zsh -i script_invoking_function"', it works. So if I want remote function invocation, I'll need to use -i or to load functions outside of .zshrc.

why zsh?

2017-May-11, Thursday 21:21
mindstalk: (Default)
When I got to Caltech and discovered Unix, the default shell on the cluster was csh, with more user features than the sh at the time, but not a lot. If you got the lowdown, you could switch to the far more useful tcsh, but the sysadmin refused to make that the default for resource reasons. There was also ksh, but I never heard people talking about it.

A few years later zsh came along, and the more techie undergraduate cluster largely switched to it en masse. It was even made the default shell there.

Out in the greater world, and in the era of Linux, bash seems the default shell, pretty much incorporating much of what was good about tcsh and ksh, and also displacing any more primitive sh. zsh still is an exotic thing even Linux people may not have heard of... which is a shame, because it's so much better.

Granted, it's also way more complicated, and a lot of its cooler features have to be turned on. If you want a shell that's full-featured out of the box, there's the even more obscure 'fish'.

And bash can approach, though not catch up to zsh, with the "bash-completion" package.

But what's so cool? Well, tab-completion can be far more powerful, working not just on filenames, but environment or shell variables, command options, man pages, process numbers, and git branches. It can also go to a menu mode, for scrolling around lots of options.

(But fish will do the magic of parsing man pages on the fly to display command options. :O )

It's easy to have your prompt display the exit code of the last command, something I find pretty useful; doing that in bash requires writing your own functions.

Likewise, you can easily have sophisticated right-hand prompts.

**/ recursive directory listing, though that is something you can turn on in bash. (shopt -s globstar)

Even more extended globbing, including excluding patterns, or selecting files based on modification time within a window and other criteria.

Redirection tricks, some of which reduce the need for tee. |& pipes stdout and stderr to a program such as less. >! can clobber files even when you have noclobber on.

I'd anticipated sticking to bash for scripting, for better standards compliance/portability, but I realized that I'm not writing a package script, just in-house tools. And zsh scripting has a lot going for it. Arrays just work, while bash arrays were described Sunday as the worst of any language. I'm using the mod time glob mentioned above.

zsh can share history between shells. I find this useful and annoying -- useful now for storing and reusing commands, but also destroys the individual history of a particular window. Oh well. An impressive application was when I found myself reusing history across *machines*, where my home dir was NFS mounted.

"Named directories" mean I can collapse long pathnames in my prompt, e.g. Main/wsgi-scripts becomes just ~WS

Probably a lot more, but those come to mind.

That said, there is one odd lacuna in zsh. bash has --rc-file, to tell it to read in a custom rc (like bashrc) file after everything else. zsh... doesn't. And sometimes I would like to start a shell with a custom additional environment, e.g. from ssh.

birthday stuff

2017-May-09, Tuesday 21:30
mindstalk: (riboku)
I haven't been good at making birthday plans since moving to Boston, but today was good. I went in to work late, expxloring Malden center instead; the library had been described as distinctive, and it does have an older building, though Cambridge main it's a Franken-building. Unlike Cambridge, you can't even go into the older part right now. I took a picture, but the margin of this post is too small to contain it[1]. I also discovered that Malden and Chelsea are affiliated with BPL, not Minuteman. Checked out a book on Angkor and one on Armenian history, I keep running into Armenians.

Some cheap restaurants present but I didn't feel hungry until right after I'd decided to set out for the station. >.< Like the rest of the Orange line, all the interesting stuff is like 10 minutes from the station.

I found another bug at work, not in my code[2]. This is good insofar as we improve the product and I get a reputation as a magical bug finder.

As it happens, in honor of the release, boss was taking us out to a fancy dinner, so I got a big thing without actually mentioning my birthday. $55 New York strip au poivre medium rare, quite good. Some other food too but it's a steakhouse, steak's where it's at. That's about as much as I've ever paid for an entire meal, back when I was working in SF and getting dragged off to some fancy places rarely. Usually $20 is my cap. But hey, wasn't paying!

Couple of Facebook people went above and beyond and sent cute and/or appropriate pictures with their greetings, and J texted me in lieu of calling, which was good because this wasn't a day for calls.

Oh right, a cute thing at work! I was wearing a Kyuubey shirt I got at Anime Boston this year, the first anime T-shirt I've bought. A guy complimented me on it, then I noticed he was wearing a FMA hoodie -- the complex circle on the front looked suspicious, but the squiggle on the back really gave it away. Demographic note: big black guy.

[1] Or I'm too lazy for my picture transfer workflow.

[2] So far I've barely written any code, apart from a logging module and a Frankenscript, it's been all learning tools and code and testing. And honestly I'd like to keep it that way, until I can read 13,000 lines of code and sort through testing them properly. brrr Python. My ideal gift right now would be a compiler.

Google fail

2017-May-07, Sunday 13:37
mindstalk: Tohsaka Rin (Rin)
I was trying to pick up my Japanese studies again, and turning to Google Translate as a way to get some daily phrases. "A bowl of rice" was given the plausible characters 米のボウル, but transliterated as "Amerika no booru". Cooked rice (kome) and America do share a kanji, but you wouldn't read it that way!

I shared with my friend in Japan, who laughed, then said you wouldn't read it as "Amerika" even when talking about America.

Also that "kome no booru" was like a bowl made out of rice (plant) or something, and not something you'd say; instead you'd use "ichizen", ichi-zen, zen being an oddly specific counter for bowls of rice or pairs of chopsticks.

So, multiple levels of machine translation fail!
mindstalk: (Default)
Brought up in discussion on RPG.net: Lorien had a ship he used to take Sheridan away from Z'ha'dum, but at the end of the series he went all lightbulb. Possibilities:

* He's an interstellar lightbulb, but needed something to bring the mortal safetly.
** ...so he just happened to have his own ship all along, which he later abandoned.
** ...so he 'borrowed' one from the Shadows or their servitors. This was my idea, and it amuses me.

* Advanced races only went interstellar lightbulb when "going beyond the Rim". Also my idea, and it seems more boringly plausible, given that the First Ones use ships usually.

MBTA passes math

2017-Apr-30, Sunday 08:11
mindstalk: (Default)
Say you're a regular commuter, taking transit at least twice a workday. 10 trips, which would cost $22.50 if you're using a CharlieCard. A 7 day pass is $21.25, so it totally makes sense to buy one, then ride the T whenever you want. Even if you somehow had a 4 day workweek, having a couple more trips would be likely.

Four 7 day passes would be $85; a monthly pass is $84.50. So that makes sense too. Or does it? Say you have three weeks of vacation, and leave town for them; maybe you'd save money by just cycling 7 day passes, and skipping the weeks you're gone.

I approached the math from a couple different angles, but this presentation seems best: a month pass costs about the same as 4 weeks, so 12 monthly passes covers the year for the cost of 48 weekly passes. Even if you skip 3 weeks, you'd still have to buy 49 passes... plus covering that extra day (or two, if leap) in the year. So go monthly!

Though, having been using 7 day passes, I noticed that they actually shuffle forward. If I buy one on Monday morning, the next Monday I can leave a bit earlier and still use it, buying (or activating) my next pass Monday evening. And so on. The effect is that you end up covering 30 days for the cost of 4 passes, as each one picks up an extra "half-day" commute. And if you shuffled into buying a pass on a weekend, well, maybe you could skip travel that day and save an extra day.

Of course, there's a week's worth of 31 day months, so there's that -- you're not quite getting a month's worth for 4 passes.

It's nice doing estimations in my head, but at some point you have to turn to a calculator for precision. A year's worth of monthly passes is $1014. If you cover 30 days with 4 weekly passes, that's $85 per 'month', and $1020 to cover 360 days, with 5 more days to finagle. OTOH, if you can skip 3 weeks, you'd spend just $956.14 in a year, saving $57.75. Or $42.57, if you threw in 5/7 of another pass for the extra days.

Of course, that assumes you can maintain the shuffle. Weekends offer skipping a day, but a regular weekend thing might pin you down. Say I activate a pass at 8pm Sunday to go to Grendel's; the next week I might leave earlier, but I'd still have to activate a new one at 11:30 to get home. The week after that I could leave Grendel's a bit earlier, activating the next pass on Monday morning... okay, it still works, though Sunday feels a bit sticky due to the short 'commute'.

Of course, the monthly pass means not having to buy stuff every week, nor worry once a week about the timing of when you do things. OTOH, saving $40 to 60... well, it's not a ton, but it's not trivial either; 40/1014 is 4%.

Extra thought: if you really use the weekends on your one-week vacations, you could save another 2 days each, or 6 days total, in effect skipping another week.

As for me, if I had today off I'd probably just go monthly. Annoyingly, I probably have 4 or 5 trips to make today. Cash today and monthly tomorrow, or weekly today?

***

Meanwhile, the $12 daily pass is hard to justify unless you run around a lot. Even for a tourist spending $2.75 per trip via CharlieTicket, it costs more than 4 trips -- though if you're doing train/bus transfers that becomes a lot easier to justify, since the Tickets don't give a free transfer. But even then you'd d need bus/train, bus/train, and one more trip. For a Card user you'd need to make 6 independent trips to make a day pass economical. Most likely use case would be having to make multiple quick trips along a train line.

On recent bouncing

2017-Apr-29, Saturday 21:48
mindstalk: (Homura)
Twice cast out, shy of permanence, I roam the 'hoods of Boston.

Hilton was horrible to a friend. Her compensation? Three nights downtown for me.

Oak Grove home, great view.
Reason? Same as price: a steep slope
And slippery icy death.

Oak Grove, land of giant parks.
Malden Center, land of small shops.
Which is more alive?

Life in Orient Heights:
East Boston famed for plane noise
Home eerily quiet

In Cambridge, geese walk the River
In Revere, planes fill the skies

"No one takes the Blue Line", say Cantabrigians
Just poorer and browner people
Who enjoy working trains.

Blue Line stations clean, bright, spacious
Are they a real subway?
Red Line gut says no.

From a plain dark box, with two forks and no can opener,
To a home full of rugs, plants, and Buddhas.

If you meet Buddha by the catbox
Try not to piss on him.

Springtime paradox:
Plants have sex by wind pollen,
I hide indoors.

Jamaica Plain green and quiet,
Land of vegans, queers, Dominicans.
Co-worker fears crime: "Please don't die!"

One hostess: absent, unmet.
One hostess: garrulous and gift-giving
One hostess: fleeing to China.

Orange Line, Blue Line, Orange Line
Not a Trader Joe's for miles.
Just great Mexican food.

life stuff

2017-Apr-23, Sunday 16:57
mindstalk: (Default)
I'm still nomadic in housing. Since leaving a friend's free basement, I've stayed in a downtown hotel, near Oak Grove (tip: prefer Malden Center), a Cambridge co-op, Orient Heights (a bit too quiet), and now in JP. I sample a range of housing as well as neighborhoods, from "motels have more character" to "totally decorated in plants and Buddha statues". In May I'll be by Malden for a month; be nice to stay somewhere long enough to make it worth buying olive oil.

Job progresses. Friday not so much: I put in some USB sticks, wanting to extract my VM image. Two of these I know worked in this laptop before. But one never became visible, the other had most of its structure missing. I tried rebooting... and the Windows laptop refused to reboot. "Required device not available". My co-workers had never seen that before, though some people on the Internet had. Unclear why it happened. My boss had been diligent in saving and labeling stuff, and was able to launch a repair process, though I had to make a trip to Braintree. (Too suburban for me.)

I can say proudly that the only thing at risk was a tool to work with; I've been good at ending the workday with no information uniquely on my laptop.

Entertainment: slowly re-reading Hodgell. Wikipedia pages on Catullus and Ovid, and linked pages on various forms of rhetoric. Watching episodes of Ghost Stories (the black comedy anime dub) with people.

US air marshalls

2017-Apr-22, Saturday 14:37
mindstalk: (Default)
"Someone forgets their gun" isn't that newsworthy; people make mistakes. This article is more interesting for the other terrifying information it includes:
"newly hired air marshals do not currently receive on-the-job training"
"Although it has an $835 million budget, agents cover less than 1% of US domestic and international flights"
"A CNN report in 2015 exposed the long hours, chaotic schedules and use of drugs and alcohol among federal air marshals"
"obtained a now-classified study commissioned by the TSA that revealed 75% of air marshals flying domestic missions were sleep-deficient"

I like that 'now-classified' bit. "Oh god, they found problems. Let's classify it so people can't see!" This is also part of why it's hard to take "leaked classified information" as an inherent civic sin.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/21/politics/air-marshal-gun-airplane-bathroom/index.html
mindstalk: (Default)
One possible categorization of train stations:

* You emerge, and are immediately in a business district or otherwise interesting area. Examples: Central, Harvard, Porter, and Davis Squares on the Boston Red Line, along with Charles/MGH and Quincy Center; Kimball on the Chicago Brown Line; almost any downtown station, at least in a healthy downtown during the workday; Maverick, Orient Heights, and Beachmont on the Boston Blue Line.

* You emerge, in a parking lot or bus station or other thing that involves a fair bit more walking, but at least can see where to go toward something interesting. Examples: Fields Corner on the Boston Red Line, where you're at a long bus stop but can spy businesses; Assembly on the Boston Orange Line, where I think you'll have to walk a block but you can see the TOD from the station; maybe Wellington, where IIRC you have to walk through a big parking garage to the TOD, but there might be signs telling you to go.

* You emerge, and see no reason not to turn around and catch another train somewhere else. Examples: some Jamaica Plain Boston Orange Line stops, where you come out to a bridge surrounded by traffic; some stops on the south branch of Chicago's Blue Line, where the train runs in a freeway median, and you come out onto an overpass, and there's nothing around; Braintree on Boston's Red Line, where after two minutes on a ramp I still hadn't even left the station yet, and couldn't see anything but giant boxy buildings; I suspect Malden Center on Boston Orange, where you're not far from Malden's center but I'm not sure you'd see it; likewise Sullivan Square on Boston Orange, where the most interesting part I know of is hidden over a rise.

Note that can include "there is stuff but you don't see it" and "there's pretty much nothing around, for real."
mindstalk: (atheist)
It's a small thing in the world, but I feel compelled to counter-act their revisionism. For once, posting is direct action! http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/article71659992.html

huh

2017-Apr-12, Wednesday 08:46
mindstalk: (Default)
post-icon: robot
post-tags: random

Huh, a forged e-mail from a different account didn't seem to work.
Nice.
mindstalk: (Default)
So yeah, I was exploring settings, and I stumbled onto this here:
https://www.dreamwidth.org/manage/settings/?cat=mobile
https://www.dreamwidth.org/manage/emailpost?mode=help

There's even a version for using PGP/GPG signing as authentication,
rather than a cleartext PIN.